Blount Family Genealogy

The Blount Family

The real expert on the Blount family line is a relative named Teri.  She has done so much research on the Blount line that you could spend a year just wading through what she has posted on Rootsweb.com.

The following photo was taken at the Blount family reunion in Brady, McCulloch County, Texas in the 1960s:

This Blount line begins with:

Frederick Blount and Miorum (Mary) Koen? – (Koen may have been her maiden name, but we do not know for sure yet).  Koen is used as a middle name and even a first name in several descendants, and there are some Koen families in the census in their vicinity.

Sam Houston at the Battle of San Jacinto.

Sam Houston at the Battle of San Jacinto. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One of his sons came to Texas and most of their family followed in the early 1800′s.  That was the family of John Thomas Blount and Clarissa Ann Cartwright.  Two of Clarissa’s brothers, Matthew and William Peter Cartwright fought at the Battle of San Jacinto in the Texas Revolution.

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Attaway Family History on this site

This Attaway genealogy is focused on the family of

John William Attaway and Matilda Virginia Northcott

The known beginning of the line is with John’s grandmother:

Sisly Attaway

Information from the Craig family bible has been generously provided by a Craig cousin that reveals a lot about the Attaway family. The father of John William, Nancy Emmer, and Sallie Attaway was John T. C. Attaway; and according to family consensus, the “C” must have stood for “Carlton.” To take it one step further, J.W. Attaway’s first child named a son “Thomas Carlton,” which suggests that the father of J. W. Attaway was named John Thomas Carlton Attaway. The same cousin has also provided a copy of Sallie Craig’s death certificate, which confirms the trail that the census records lead us to. Thanks to another cousin in Sallie Craig’s line, we now have a copy of a 150 year old marriage license for John T C Attaway and Belinda Beck. We have found J. W. Attaway’s mother Sisly in the 1850 census along with his father’s brother, William.

According to family historians,  John William’s father J.T.C. Attaway was a sandy-haired Irishman who came here from Ireland as a young boy.    The Ireland connection has not been found yet.  The 1840 Talbot county Georgia census finds him at the age of 5 living with his brother William and mother Sisly Attaway.  The assumption is that she was widowed.

John T.C. Attaway married Belinda (Malinda) Beck, a young woman of French descent, who died young.

Bingham Ancestry for this site

Y chromosome DNA icon

Image via Wikipedia

This line of Binghams has been very difficult to trace. When we began this search, no living member of our family that we could find even knew the names James S. Bingham and Lavica Ann Dyches Bingham.  By participating in a Family Tree DNA  project in May 2004, we got a match with two other participants.

FamilyTreeDNA.com

FamilyTreeDNA.com (Photo credit: jasonpearce)

An explanation of the process best comes from that site, which states “The Y-Chromosome is passed from father to son unchanged, except for a mutation about every 500 generations. Testing the y chromosome provides a genetic finger print consisting of 12 or 25 markers. This finger print is then compared against that of other men in the Surname Project by matching the markers. By comparing the fingerprints, or markers you can determine if you are related”. Family Tree DNA currently has over 800 surname projects. To see if there is one for a surname you are interested in, go to this site.

This line begins with James S. Bingham and Lavica Ann Dyches.

Moving Ancestry Site

After nearly a decade of this website being at http://www.bingham-keith.us, it is time to move to the new home – here!  Unfortunately, that means a lot of work.  After that long, the genealogy collection has become daunting, and I am painfully aware of the lack of maintenance.  The Family Tree is long overdue for shaping and some care, and my genealogy software is horribly outdated.  So, it’s back to work!

As for those of you who have emailed corrections at the old site, please accept my apologies.  Better communication is one of the goals for this new site.  For now, please direct any further communication to the “Contacts” page on this site.

As for timeline to complete the move – hard to say, but it will likely be months.  The “royal we” don’t move as quickly as we used to :-).

Thanks for visiting!  And please visit my Bible reading blog at http://graceofourlord.wordpress.com!